Our mission

The EASL International Liver Foundation is a global non-profit organization, established by the European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), committed to increasing the quality of life and reducing premature mortality for the greatest number of people by improving liver health.

Portfolio

VIRAL HEPATITIS ELIMINATION

Taking the micro-elimination path.

research & development

We translate liver science into practice.

Education

We empower health providers across all levels of specialisation in the management of patients with liver disease around the world.

public awareness

We want you to know more about your liver so you can enjoy a healthy life.

News

20.02.2018

Registration for the 1st Kidney Meets Liver Meeting in Amsterdam on 16th March 2018 is open!

Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare diagnosis in clinical practice by far less common than other liver diseases such as viral hepatitis. However, data on DILI incidence in the general population are very limited. A main barrier to undertake these studies is the lack of a standard for DILI diagnosis so suspected cases should undergo a formal causality assessment process, which always result in some degree of uncertainty.
Learn more

20.02.2018

EILF NAFLD Policy Review is Launching this month

Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare diagnosis in clinical practice by far less common than other liver diseases such as viral hepatitis. However, data on DILI incidence in the general population are very limited. A main barrier to undertake these studies is the lack of a standard for DILI diagnosis so suspected cases should undergo a formal causality assessment process, which always result in some degree of uncertainty.
Learn more

20.02.2018

New Project alert: Viral Hepatitis Elimination in Migrants

Idiosyncratic drug-induced liver injury (DILI) is a rare diagnosis in clinical practice by far less common than other liver diseases such as viral hepatitis. However, data on DILI incidence in the general population are very limited. A main barrier to undertake these studies is the lack of a standard for DILI diagnosis so suspected cases should undergo a formal causality assessment process, which always result in some degree of uncertainty.
Learn more